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Two Eventful Days in Luz/Lagos

By Ben

sunny 17 °C
View Koning/Zemliak Family Europe 2012/2013 on KZFamily's travel map.

Lagos: Saturday Market

Lagos: Saturday Market

In the morning Muriel and I let the kids sleep and have a lazy start to the day. In the end they were quite industrious choosing to do a bit of school work while we went into Lagos to check out the Saturday market. The day was bright and sunny with the temperature easily reaching 20 degrees. The market is quite a busy place with an equal mix of Brits and Portuguese shoppers and sellers. There were all kinds of veggies, fruits, nuts and baked goods for sale along with the occasional live rabbit and rooster. At one stall we just wanted to buy a single onion so the farmer insistently waved off any payment for such piddlly amount. We were surprised by such an easy mix of cultures, you feel that at this time of year it is more a meeting of locals then a tourist event.

Lagos: Boat

Lagos: Boat

After spending a few euros for lemons, tomatoes, peppers, carrots, Portuguese donuts and a few other items Muriel and I strolled the promenade along the channel that connects the Lagos Marina with the ocean. At the mouth of the channel is the old fortress (or alcazaar) and a nice patch of beach with some unique rock formations. We were yearning to put on our shorts and flip flops which was at odds with what we saw: many Brits walking around in sweater vests and woolen dress pants and locals bundled up in expectation of sub-zero temperatures. We saw a young boy on his scooter wearing a toque, a hoodie and a winter coat over that and his dad wearing a thick wool sweater and warm jacket. It must get pretty hot here in the summer for people to think that 20 degrees was cold.

After our walk Muriel and I went to the Intermarche to get groceries to see us through until Monday. Muriel was feeling very adventurous and wanted to fulfill Hannah's desire to make an authentic paella. Muriel bought fresh mussels, clams, prawns and squid which amounted to only about 7 euros. We gathered all the other ingredients for our feast and headed for home.

Luz: Family Portrait on the Beach

Luz: Family Portrait on the Beach

After lunch we headed back to the beach in Luz with the kids. I put on shorts and we all were shod with flip flops so we could be ready to walk in the surf. We had a wonderful few hours strolling the beach and leaving evidence of Canada written in the sand. There were only a handful of people on the beach and a few of them were fishing in the surf and a very few were wearing shorts and short sleeves.

Luz: Our Rustic Farm Home

Luz: Our Rustic Farm Home

Muriel and Hannah started working on our paella feast when we returned home. When Hannah was getting things out of the fridge she got quite an electrical shock. She thought it was a bad case of static electricity (very odd in the current damp coastal climate). A little while later Muriel also got a shock from the fridge and then a big shock from the microwave sitting on top of the fridge. The timer on the microwave was broken so we had just been vigilant about turning it off when we were done. I moved the fridge from the wall and disconnected the microwave which seemed to address the problem. Just another of a growing list of broken or dysfunctional equipment (many light switches only work sporadically and a few light fixtures cast light only at a fraction of their potential). Undeterred the two chefs moved on with cooking. It was quite the production with Hannah peeling prawns and Muriel steaming mussels etc. In the midst of the labors the cold water line under the sink sprung a large leak and a flood of water suddenly cascaded out of the kitchen cabinet. I was able to turn off the cold water valve avoiding a flood and we mopped up and moved on with the cooking. Looking under the sink I saw the sink overflow was only connected to a plastic bag so a good thing we never overfilled the sink.
With only hot water available in the kitchen and the possibility of either death by electrocution, gas oven explosion or smoke inhalation from the soaking firewood in the stove, we decided that maybe we had put up with enough rustic charm. I tried to track down our landlord but she was out and her somewhat deaf partner/live-in/renter (found out she has recently divorced) could only say that has never happened before. A couple of hours later Ruth did pop in looking quite apologetic and forlorne. We told her of the latest happenings and she was quick in offering another microwave but said not much could happen with the plumbing until Monday. We gently told her that we would need to be moving on the next day to which she said that not everyone was cut out for the rustic setting especially in the winter but she could understand. We said we would let her know in the morning if we were able to secure other accommodation.

Luz: Paella Masterpiece by Hannah and Muriel

Luz: Paella Masterpiece by Hannah and Muriel

All the calamity did not overshadow the incredible feast that Hannah and Muriel prepared. We were totally amazed by the adventurous tastes of Abby and Hannah who partook in all the shellfish and showed no fear of ripping off the heads of their prawns and pulling off the feet. Hannah showed a particular liking for squid tentacles. I guess the fussy eater phase is passing.

I played a game of Wizards with the kids while Muriel rested. She seems to be coming down with something-I guess it was only a matter of time. Muriel turned in early and when the kids went to bed I stayed up and searched for a new place to stay. I was quite delighted with some last minute deals that I found at some local self-catering resorts. The prices rivalled the camping bungalows we were first considering. I decided to sleep on it and show Muriel in the morning. It was not the best night sleep for me, perhaps I was dreaming about what other calamity could occur before daybreak.

In the morning I showed Muriel the places on-line and we choose one just 1.5 km from our rustic farm accommodation. When I booked the price had fallen to about 124 dollars Canadian for two nights which was less than what we were paying for the rustic abode. We got not quite a full refund for our remaining two nights as Ruth said she did not have any more cash on hand. Fortunately (unbeknownst to her) it was equal to the cost of our new place so we didn’t argue.

We headed off to church before settling into our new home. We dressed warmly because we suspected the church would be cold inside. We sweated outside for a bit but were proven right by the chilly temperature but warm reception by the congregation inside. They were selling preserves before and after the service as a fundraiser so we now have some nice strawberry jam and a delicious multifruit chutney. It seems that this church has a preference for Canadians since their last vicar was from Canada and the new one they are expecting in a few weeks is also from Canada. We enjoyed the service which was very similar to a Catholic mass. The fact that the Anglicans share the church with a Catholic congregation and have some joint services accounts for the closer association with Catholicism than we have witnessed in other Anglican churches we have attended.

Luz: Our Resort Home Baia da Luz

Luz: Our Resort Home Baia da Luz

We headed off after the service to check in at the resort. When we got into our apartment we nearly fell over. Our place is around a whopping 1200 square feet and very high end with all the bells and whistles you can think of for less than 63 dollars Canadian a night (kids have separate beds, we have a huge room with full ensuite, there is a gourmet kitchen and posh dining room). The only thing we lack is in-room WiFi, but we are willing to rough it. :) The resort must have somewhere between 100 and 200 units but we think less than ten may actually be occupied.

Luz: View from the Bluff

Luz: View from the Bluff

It looks like we got here just in time as Muriel seems to be succumbing to some sort of bug and has slept the afternoon away. Abby stayed with Muriel to be a nurse and do some homework while Hannah and I set off to explore and climb the bluffs overlooking Luz. It was a very rewarding climb. The fresh air and vista was breathtaking and the together time was special. It is slightly overcast this afternoon so the temperature is closer to 15 degrees down from 18 degrees in the shade this morning.

We will have a late supper and a quiet evening. We might take in some British television that is available here. I will pop out to the reception area to post this write up and start searching for places to stay when we journey to southern Spain in the next few days (or not depending on health, moods and weather).

Posted by KZFamily 09.12.2012 13:33 Archived in Portugal Tagged lagos luz

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Comments

Glad see you are enjoying yourselfs greatly,the food photos only leave me hungry. Hope Muriel bounces quickly.

George

09.12.2012 by George Koning

Hi Pioneer family,

What an adventure!! You have proven again when you keep a cool head and eat well, usually things turn out OK. It is nice that you have very good accommodation now especially since Muriel is not feeling well.

The girls are good cooks and dare to cook new entrees. May I suggest that in due time you buy a life chicken. I am sure Hannah would be able to butcher a chicken. Take my word for it; it is not very difficult to do. Do not start with a rabbit that is more difficult and they scream.

I was pleased to see palm trees, I like palm trees. In Nanaimo they have a few and they have not grown one inch in the last 35 years. If I am not mistaken you seem to be able to use English from time to time, unless you are more proficient in Spanish.

Have you seen some protestant churches during you travels? Was the Anglican congregation a big congregation? Do you see any farms? I know I ask a lot of questions and I know eventually I will get some answers.

I am looking forward to the next report. I hope Muriel will soon feel better. You are well off to have two daughters who are very able to look after their parents. Opa.

09.12.2012 by G.Koning

23:27 pst 09/12/12
Sorry Ben , had commented on your pictures before you posted your update so I now know why you had two abodes.
In Barbados where we stay when we visit family on the East Coast the salt air from the sea and the winds will attack anything it can and you will get rusted and corroded electrical fixture , including appliances.Wood even in concrete will fall apart like termites, salt will be on the beddings, floor. Every day you take a wipe and wash floors xn times. Microwaves have a reputation of being replaced in a few years and phones and jacks connection will break apart. Normally we cover the microwave and freeze with thick towels or a cover to improve the life. Wall sockets will rust at the connection or salt will rest so as you say a shock or worse is wating to happen. I'm glad you resolved , we nornally look for marine parts but expensive. Guess your rustic landlord looks into as the situation occurs though the drain catck pipe as a plastic bag.. a new one , probably an emergency fix till the part comes in which was not ordered, who knows.
Lord works in intersting ways as now you all have a fantastic place to stay at , really upsale for a great price and Muriel can have a needed rest.
I had squid a few day ago that my grandsdaughter (8) likes but to me it was like chewing rubber.. yuk
Oh, at 20C I'd have a sweater and shoes on also but I can understand why it warm for you all compared to prior week.
Cheers

09.12.2012 by RobBar

23:35 pst 09/12/12
I meant to ask, are you using a smartphone with a local SIM provider or an IPad with SIM and did rustic landlord provide WiFi or internet access

09.12.2012 by RobBar

Rob, we are not using a phone while in Europe (just pay phones as required). Our rustic place had wifi in a certain corner of the living room (closest to her house).

10.12.2012 by KZFamily

Pa, people at the church said they had a parish of about 150 but Abby counted 50m (including the vicar) the day we went. We see a lot of small farms, with either cattle, sheep or goats; and orange groves (Helen told us to pick some while we're here but we haven't got close enough yet).

10.12.2012 by KZFamily

Hey family Koning, sorry its been a while since I have checked in. It seems like life in Portugal is agreeing with you all. The markets as I remember were fun to explore. The meats for sale are a sight to behold, especially with what appears to be limited refridgeration. The dinner of pallea was beautifully presented... I could almost taste!

14.12.2012 by Helen Koning

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